Interview Questions for Graduate Studies

Friday, March 24

Job interviews can be very scary, so naturally an interview for your graduate studies application is down right terrifying. I'm hoping that I'll be hearing back soon that I have been selected to attend an interview for my master's application. (fingers crossed!) 
I thought that I would do some research and figure out some things to be aware of for graduate studies interviews, in case I get a chance to attend one!


Some things to consider:
- These are things I've read regarding Psychology interviews, but I'm sure they can be modified to fit other programs or even job interviews.
- I am not an interviewer, therefore I cannot confirm 100% that these are what someone will ask you, or what you should ask the interviewer. These are just things that I found that I thought might be helpful. 
- I am seriously considering using all of the things I will include in this post.


Things you could be asked in a Psychology Master's interview:
- Your goals, and experiences that have prepared you for the program you're applying to
- Factors that have drawn you to their particular program and school
- Ethical dilemmas/difficult decisions that you will have to solve (There might not be a right answer either; they will be looking at your thought process, and ability to see many aspects of a problem)



Things you should ask in a Psychology Master's interview:
- If you complete this degree/program, what additional steps will you need to complete to become a licensed practitioner?
- What support is available for helping you find a practicum/internship placement (if applicable)?
- How will this program prepare you for a PhD program, should you decide to pursue one?
- Ask your potential supervisor about their mentoring style and how often they meet with their students


Some other tips I have read: 
- Turn your interview in to a discussion: about about research you've done and ask about their research. Talk about the aspects you're interested in and ask questions about the things you are unsure of
- It might be a good idea to look at recent articles from the staff at the university of the interview if you do not have a general idea of the topic you want to research while there, or do not have any supervisors lined up
- After the interview has been completed, send a thank you email. This shows gratitude. I have read that you can inquire about when it is expected to hear back about acceptances but make a point not to pester! 


There are lots of resources online to help you prepare for an academic interview or a prospective job interview. Hopefully some of these will help you if you're asked to attend an interview!


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